What is the OASIS Energy Interoperation TC ?


What is the OASIS Energy Interoperation TC ?

https://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tc_home.php?wg_abbrev=energyinterop

Enabling the Collaborative and Transactive use of Energy

David Holmberg, david.holmberg@nist.gov, Chair
William Cox, wtcox@coxsoftwarearchitects.com, Chair
Girish Ghatikar, gghatikar@lbl.gov, Secretary

Table of Contents
Announcements
Overview
Subcommittees
Technical Work Produced by the Committee
Expository Work Produced by the Committee
External Resources
Mailing Lists and Comments
Additional Information
Announcements

Energy Interoperation Version 1.0 Committee Specification is now complete and published in the OASIS archives. All license rights as defined in the specification are now available to developers and other users of the work product. The Acrobat PDF form is authoritative for the specification; the schemas and WSDL files are authoritative for machine-readable artifacts.

This work product is in the latter stages of the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel Catalog of Standards process as of late March, 2012.

Implementation work is in progress, including that of the OpenADR Alliance. In addition, two open source projects implementing Energy Interoperation 1.0 and/or profiles are starting up; more details will be posted here when known.

We strongly encourage feedback from users, developers and others, whether OASIS members or not, for the sake of improving the interoperability and quality of OASIS work. All previously submitted comments (for this work as well as other works of the TC) are publicly archived and can be viewed in the Energy Interoperation Issue Tracker archive.

Energy Interoperation relies on the OASIS EMIX Specification for communication of price and product defintion. The final published version of Energy Market Information Exchange (EMIX) Version 1.0 can be found in the OASIS archives; the final published version of WS-Calendar 1.0 is also in the archives.

Price and product definition are actionable information. When presented with standard messages conveying price and product, automated systems can make decisions to optimize energy and economic results. In regulated electricity markets, price and products often are defined by complex tariffs, derived through political processes. EMIX defines the information for use in messages that convey this actionable information. An essential distinction between energy and other markets is that price is strongly influenced by time of delivery. EMIX conveys time and interval by incorporating WS-Calendar into tenders, contracts, and performance calls.

EMIX was prepared in response the the NIST SMart Grid Roadmap and the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel (SGIP) Prioirity Action Plan 03 (PAP03). It is based upon WS-Calendar for the common communication of time and schedule (PAP04) and is used extensively in Energy Interoperation (PAP09).

OASIS and the EnergyInterop TC welcome your comments. To submit comments, click the “Send A Comment” link on the EITC home page and follow the instructions to subscribe to the energyinterop-comment email list, then send comments to that list. If you are a member of the TC, please use the Jira tracking tool to submit comments instead.

The Energy Interoperation TC works closely with the OASIS Energy Market Information Exchange (eMIX) TC and the OASIS WS-Calendar TC, which respectively are developing standards for exchanging pricing information and product definitions in energy markets and common schedule information.
Participation in the Energy Interoperation TC is open to all interested parties, including: implementers of facility agents, embedded communications clients in control systems, and gateways; Independent System Operators; providers or aggregators of energy provision, curtailment, and use; and operators of transmission, distribution, and utilities.

Contact member-services@oasis-open.org or the co-chairs for more information on joining the TC.

Overview

The Energy Interoperation TC works to define interaction between Smart Grids and their end nodes, including Smart Buildings, Enterprises, Industry, Homes, and Vehicles. The TC develops data and communication models that enable the interoperable and standard exchange of signals for dynamic pricing, reliability, and emergencies. The TC’s agenda also extends to the communication of market participation data (such as bids), load predictability, and generation information.

For more information, see the Committee Charter and FAQ.

Subcommittees

No subcommittees have been formed for this TC.

Technical Work Produced by the Committee

See Announcements for the final publication of the Energy Interoperation Version 1.0 Committee Specification.

Expository Work Produced by the Committee

There are no approved expository work products for this TC yet.

External Resources

OASIS Blue white paper

SGIP Collaborative Energy Status page

Relationships of OASIS Collaborative Energy Standards (somewhat out of date)

Mailing Lists and Comments

energyinterop: the list used by TC members to conduct Committee work. TC membership is required to post. TC members are automatically subscribed; the public may view archives.

energyinterop-comment: a public mail list for providing input to the OASIS Energy Interoperation TC members. Send a comment or view archives.

Additional Information

Group Email Address:
energyinterop@lists.oasis-open.org
Providing Feedback: OASIS welcomes feedback on its technical activities from potential users, developers, and others to better assure the interoperability and quality of OASIS work.

What is OASIS Energy Market Information Exchange (eMIX) TC ?


What is OASIS Energy Market Information Exchange (eMIX) TC ?

https://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tc_home.php?wg_abbrev=emix

Exchanging price information and product definitions in energy markets and to those following markets

William Cox, wtcox@coxsoftwarearchitects.com, Chair
Edward Cazalet, ed@cazalet.com, Chair

Table of Contents

Announcements
Overview
Subcommittees
Technical Work Produced by the Committee
Expository Work Produced by the Committee
External Resources
Mailing Lists and Comments
Additional Information
Announcements

Energy Market Information Exchange (EMIX) Version 1.0 is now complete and published in the OASIS archives. All license rights as defined in the specification are now available to developers and other users of the work product. The Acrobat PDF form is authoritative for the specification; the schemas and WSDL files are authoritative for machine-readable artifacts.

This work product is included in the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel Catalog of Standards after Governing Board and Membership acceptance. See their EMIX-specific page for more information.

Implementation work is in progress, including by members of the OpenADR Alliance and TeMIX Inc. In addition, two open source projects implementing Energy Interoperation 1.0 and/or profiles that use the EMIX information model are starting up.

We strongly encourage feedback from users, developers and others, whether OASIS members or not, for the sake of improving the interoperability and quality of OASIS work. All previously submitted comments (for this work as well as other works of the TC) are publicly archived and can be viewed in the Energy Market Information Exchange Issue Tracker archive. Submitted comments (for this work as well as other works of that TC) are publicly archived and can be viewed at http://lists.oasis- open.org/archives/emix-comment/.

Energy markets and sales have been characterized by tariffs and embedded knowledge that make decision automation difficult. Smart grids introduce rapidly changing products and product availability, with associated dynamic prices. Lack of standardized messages conveying a standardized vocabulary for market information has been a barrier to development and deployment of technology to respond to changing market circumstances.

Price and product definition are actionable information. When presented with standard messages conveying price and product, automated systems can make decisions to optimize energy and economic results. In regulated electricity markets, price and products often are defined by complex tariffs, derived through political processes. EMIX defines the information for use in messages that convey this actionable information. An essential distinction between energy and other markets is that price is strongly influenced by time of delivery. EMIX conveys time and interval by incorporating WS-Calendar into tenders, contracts, and performance calls.

An essential distinction between energy and other markets is that price is strongly influenced by time of delivery. Energy for sale at 2:00 AM, when energy use is low, is not the same price as energy for sale at the same location at 2:00 PM, during the working day. EMIX conveys time and interval by incorporating WS-Calendar into tenders, contracts, and performance calls.

Not all market information is available in real time. Present day markets, particularly wholesale markets, may have deferred charges (e.g. balancing charges) that cannot be determined at point of sale. Other markets may require additional purchases to allow the use of the energy purchased (e.g. same-time transmission rights or pipeline fees when accepting delivery on a forward contract). EMIX is useful for representing available price and product information.

OASIS and the EMIX TC welcome your comments. To submit comments, click the “Send A Comment” link on the EMIX TC home page and follow the instructions to subscribe to the emix-comment email list, then simply send comments to that list. If you are a member of the TC, please use the Jira tracking tool to submit comments instead.

We also call your attention to the OASIS IPR Policy applicable to the work of this technical committee. All members of the TC should be familiar with this document, which may create obligations regarding the disclosure and availability of a member’s patent, copyright, trademark and license rights that read on an approved OASIS specification. OASIS invites any persons who know of any such claims to disclose these if they may be essential to the implementation of the above specification, so that notice of them may be posted to the notice page for this TC’s work.

The approach taken by the TC mirrors that taken by the ISO/RTO Council in developing information exchange requirements for Demand Response: First the required business information exchanges are analyzed, then types and inheritance from the relevant range of shared information models are assigned. The TC has largely completed the first phase, hence this informal public review.

We welcome interested parties to join the TC as it continues to develop its specifications. Participation in the eMIX TC is open to all interested parties, including: energy market participants (retail, wholesale, curtailment, forward and futures trading markets); ISOs and RTOs; aggregators of energy provision; generators; and providers of Smart devices. Contact join@oasis-open.org or the TC chairs for more information on joining the TC.

This work was prepared in response the the NIST Smart Grid Roadmap and the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel (SGIP) Prioirity Action Plan 03 (PAP03) which is now ccompleted. It is based upon WS-Calendar for the common communication of time and schedule (PAP04) and is used extensively in Energy Interoperation (PAP09) which is approaching its second Public Review

Overview

The OASIS eMIX TC works to define standards for exchanging energy characteristics, availability, and schedules to support the free and effective exchange of information. Better communication of actionable energy prices will help enable and expand efficient markets that satisfy the growing demand for lower-carbon, lower-energy buildings, net zero-energy systems, and supply-demand integration that take advantage of dynamic pricing. Businesses, homes, electric vehicles and the power grid will benefit from automated and timely communication of energy price, characteristics, quantities, and related information.

eMIX focuses on methods of exchanging market information consistent with the OASIS Blue approach, encompassing consistency, transparency, and security.

The eMIX TC works closely with the OASIS Energy Interoperation TC and the OASIS WS-Calendar TC, which respectively are developing Web services-based information and communication models for exchanging dynamic pricing, reliability, and emergency signals and information on energy market participation (such as bids), load predictability, and generation, and common schedule information.

For more information on eMIX, see the TC Charter.

Subcommittees

No subcommittees have been formed for this TC.

Technical Work Produced by the Committee

Energy Market Information Exchange (EMIX) Version 1.0 is now complete and published in the OASIS archives. See Announcements above for details.

Expository Work Produced by the Committee

The Technical Commitee’s TEMIX White Paper is available for discussion and comment.

Six Committee Note Drafts; final ballots are planned soon:

EMIX Overview Version 1.0
EMIX 1.0 and the OASIS Smart Grid Suite of Standards
Using EMIX 1.0 to support Transactive Energy Markets
Transactive Energy Market Information Exchange (TeMIX) using EMIX 1.0
TEMIX, a transactive profile of EMIX 1.0
Retail Block & Tier Prices using EMIX 1.0 (minor correction in process; see External Resources for the corrected and extended update)
External Resources

The eMIX TC works as part of the U.S. National Institute of Standards and Technology [NIST] Priority Action Plan for Smart Grid Interoperability and the Priority Action Plan 3 Working Group. This work is now facilitated by the SmartGrid Inteorperability Panel in conjunction with NIST.

The Committee Note Draft Retail Block & Tier Prices using EMIX 1.0 has been extended to a paper in Grid-Interop 2011 titled OASIS Collaborative Energy Standards, Facilities, and ZigBee Smart Energy; a preprint is available at the link. The paper shows how any facility management system that can support block & tier price information and demand response can accept and respond to information for Energy Interoperation 1.0/OpenADR 2 and EMIX.

Mailing Lists and Comments

emix: the list used by TC members to conduct Committee work. TC membership is required to post. TC members are automatically subscribed; the public may view archives.

emix-comment: a public mail list for providing input to the OASIS eMIX TC members. Send a comment or view archives.

Additional Information

Providing Feedback: OASIS welcomes feedback on its technical activities from potential users, developers, and others to better assure the interoperability and quality of OASIS work.

What is the OASIS Open Building Information Exchange (oBIX) TC


What is the OASIS Open Building Information Exchange (oBIX) TC

https://www.oasis-open.org/committees/tc_home.php?wg_abbrev=obix

Enabling mechanical and electrical control systems in buildings to communicate with enterprise applications

Toby Considine, toby.considine@unc.edu, Chair
Chris Bogen, chris.bogen@erdc.dren.mil, Secretary

Table of Contents

Announcements
Overview
Technical Work Produced by the Committee
Expository Work Produced by the Committee
External Resources
Mailing Lists and Comments
Additional Information
Announcements

2013.01.16:
oBIX has a preliminary new workplan that finishes 1.1 as a core specification, and develops additional specification for oBIX interactions with such BIM-derived standards as BAMie, COBie, et al. A key issue is how to incorporate WS-Calendar.

2010.06.02:
A new draft is available matching the current OASIS specification standards (which have changed since 1.0). This is mostly a direct port of the prior version which was “hidden” in the oBIX-XML subcommittee. You can find it in the Documents section.

2009.06.30:
oBIX was identified in the EPRI report to NIST to develop a national Smart Grid Roadmap as a specification critical to the development of the smart grid. http://www.nist.grov/smartgrid

2009.04.17:
The oBIX committee as begun discussions of a verion 1.1 of the specification. The goals of the revision are to eliminate some ambiguities in 1.0, to incorporate some schedule elements from WS-Calendar (in formation) and to add the conformance statements necessary to bring the specification to an OASIS standard vote.

2008.01.10:
We are creating a new sub-committee to develop a reference Specification for acquiring Enterprise-ready Building Systems. The reference specification will not deal with system performance or selection. Its realm is the characterstics of the interface that must be provided by the Building System integrator. The sub-committee plans to rely on the OASIS SOA Reference model. We invite interested parties to sign up.

2007.11.15:
The oBIX XML Standards SC has been hard at work and plans to finish updates to the core spec by the end of the year and to complete the scheduling model by the end of February 2008. After corrections and clarifications, the key adds to the core spec will be date and time objects to support the upcoming scheduling model.

2006.12:
The Open Building Information Exchange v1.0 became a OASIS Committee Specification in December, 2006. The specification document and related files can be downloaded from:

http://www.oasis-open.org/committees/download.php/21462/obix-1.0-cs-01.zip (Zip Archive containing editable source (Word), HTML and PDF and related files)
Submitted comments (for this work as well as other works of that TC) are publicly archived and can be viewed at lists.oasis-open.org/archives/obix-comment/. br /> All comments submitted to OASIS are subject to the OASIS Feedback License, which ensures that the feedback you provide carries the same obligations as submissions of the TC members.

An oBIX 1.1 is being planned to address some minor wish list items that have come from within the oBIX community and from allied spaces.

Brian Frank has released a version of the oBIX tool kit for JAVA on SourceForge. Downloadable source can be found at oBIX SourceForge repository

Overview

The purpose of oBIX (open Building Information Exchange) is to enable the mechanical and electrical control systems in buildings to communicate with enterprise applications, and to provide a platform for developing new classes of applications that integrate control systems with other enterprise functions. Enterprise functions include processes such as Human Resources, Finance, Customer Relationship Management (CRM), and Manufacturing.

For more information, see the TC Charter and FAQ

Technical Work Produced by the Committee

oBIX v1.0 has been accepted as a Committee Specification. oBIX v1.0 can be downloaded by the public. (12/2006)

An open source JAVA toolkit for working with oBIX is being developed in parallel with the standard. THe JavA Toolkit for the standard can be downloaded from the oBIX Sourceforge repository

LonMark Japan offers a non-normative Japanese translation of the oBIX v1.0 Committee Specification.

Expository Work Produced by the Committee

See Brian Frank’s high-level presentation on oBIX v0.11. (May 2, 2006)

Aaron Hansen prepared a summary of the nearly complete version 1 of oBIX in April, 2006.

An update on oBIX was presented at the Summer 2005 Facilities Maintenance and Operations Committee (FMOC) sponsored by the National Institute of Building Sciences (NIBS). The Powerpoint is available here.

Toby Considine’s Spring 2005 view of the challenge of oBIX can be found in the Roadmap for oBIX (April 2005)

Peter Manolescue’s introduction to oBIX is a good place to start. (August 2004)

External Resources

A short list of Industry and Government Groups whose interests and purpose OBIX is designed to support

Green Building XML, referred to as “gbXML”, was developed to enable integrated interoperability between building design and engineering analysis tools.
Fiatech – bringing information technology to capital projects
HTNG.ORG – Hotel Technology Next Generation
US Green Building Council
IAI-NA – International Association for Interoperability in the building life-cycle
GridWise Architectural Council – a Department of Energy program to tranform the electric system to create a society of devices that functions as an integrated transactive system
NBIMS and buildingSmart are efforts to create a complete life-cycle data model for a building, extending beyond the design and construction focus of the IAI. Both efforts are trying to move beyong conformance to interoperability.
UnitsML is a NIST-sponsored OASIS TC defining an XML-based specification to enable the unambiguous representation of units of measure
EnergyPlus is a DOE sponsored building energy simulation program for modeling building heating, cooling, lighting, ventilating, and other energy flows. EnergyPlus is able to read BIM directly, so there is some interest in adopting a similar surface for oBIX.
The OASIS Emergency Management TC sees several scenarios that would require a building to respond to oBIX contracts invoked within a distribution element.
Mailing Lists and Comments

obix: the list used by TC members to conduct Committee work. TC membership is required to post. TC members are automatically subscribed; the public may view archives.

obix-comment: a public mail list for providing input to the OASIS oBIX Technical Committee members. Send a comment or view archives.

obix-dev: an unmoderated, public mail list that provides an open forum for developers to exchange ideas and information on implementing the obix OASIS Specification. Subscribe or view archives.*

*To minimize spam, you must subscribe to these lists before posting.

For technical assistance regarding this OASIS TC web page, contact webmaster@oasis-open.org.

Providing Feedback: OASIS welcomes feedback on its technical activities from potential users, developers, and others to better assure the interoperability and quality of OASIS work.

ENERGY MARKETS TRADING, SMART GRID – What is New Daedalus?


What is New Daedalus?
Building Intelligence meets the Intelligent Building. The Intelligent Building negotiates with the Intelligent Grid. Emergency Management sends requests to the Intelligent Building to share its situation awareness with the first responder.

The concrete precision world of resource constrained embedded systems is recognizing the economical excess power provided by commodity computing. Readily available open source and free databases on these platforms are moving these systems from internal hash tables to OLAP. International consortia meet to find the ontology of meaning in engineered systems.

The internal processes of the control systems are being abstracted into services that can be offered up to the enterprise and to the home. System disciplines are now in place to build internet-scale control systems in which heterogeneity is the norm.

What can we build with these new tools? How will these trends transform how we interact with the physical world?

Two weeks ago, I participated in the GridWise Architectural Council’s Symposium on Business Interface Definitions. Last week I participated in the annual OASIS Open Standards Symposium as chair of oBIX . At both events I was asked “Where do you blog on this stuff?” In answer, here is The New Daedalus .

Sony’s Bread and Butter? It’s Not Electronics, it’s Insurance and Financial Services


Sony’s Bread and Butter? It’s Not Electronics, it’s Insurance and Financial Services

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/28/business/global/sonys-bread-and-butter-its-not-electronics.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Sony has made money making Hollywood movies and selling music. That profitable part of the business is what Daniel S. Loeb, an American investor and manager of the hedge fund Third Point, wants Sony to spin off to raise cash to resuscitate its electronics business.

But as Mr. Loeb pressures Sony executives to do more to revive the company’s ailing electronics arm, some analysts are asking, Why bother?

Sony, it is suggested, might be better off just selling insurance.

Or just making movies and music. But not electronics.

A new report from the investment banking firm Jefferies delivered a harsh assessment of Sony’s electronics business. “Electronics is its Achilles’ heel and, in our view, it is worth zero,” wrote Atul Goyal, consumer technology analyst for Jefferies, in the report, released this week.

“In our view, it needs to exit most electronics markets.”

The maker of the Walkman and the Trinitron without electronics? What would it do?

Although Sony sells hundreds of products as varied as batteries and head-mounted 3-D displays, it so happens that Sony’s most successful business is selling insurance. While it doesn’t run this business in the United States or Europe, Sony makes a lot of money writing life, auto and medical policies in Japan.

Its financial arm accounts for 63 percent of Sony’s total operating profit last year. Life insurance has been its biggest moneymaker over the last decade, earning the company 933 billion yen ($9.07 billion) in operating profit in the 10 years that ended in March.

Sony’s film and music divisions, which produced hits like the Spider-Man movies and “Zero Dark Thirty” and recorded musicians like the cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the electronic music duo Daft Punk, have contributed $7 billion to the company’s bottom line over the last decade.

In that time, Sony’s electronics division has lost a cumulative $8.5 billion.

Hardly Sony’s crown jewels, experts say.

“The problem is that the board is still absolutely focused on fixing electronics,” said Kouji Yamada, a visiting professor at Hitotsubashi University in Tokyo and research director of Mission Value Partners, a Sonoma, Calif., investment company.

Sony’s chief executive, Kazuo Hirai, said last Wednesday that its board would consider Third Point’s proposal, even as it emphasized that the discussions were preliminary and that it had not set a time for a response.

But to a small band of analysts, Mr. Loeb’s prescriptions for Sony are shortsighted, merely milking the company’s profit-making content business for good money to throw after the bad.

As proof of the untenable future facing Sony’s electronics, critics point to its televisions and smartphones. Competition is intense, and in cellphones Sony remains a bit player. Even where it is more successful, in digital cameras or game consoles, it is struggling to stay abreast of stronger companies.

Sheer lack of managerial attention could soon start to hurt Sony’s insurance and entertainment divisions, Mr. Yamada warned. Sony Financial Holdings, a publicly traded company of which Sony owns 60 percent, has been underperforming its peers on the Tokyo stock exchange. Its share price has risen just 4 percent this year, compared to a 36 percent increase in shares of its rival, Dai-ichi Life Insurance.

And in the entertainment business, where alliances and tie-ups are starting to dominate strategy, Sony’s film and music units could be slowed by having to deal with a board that sits in Tokyo and does not have its hand on the pulse of a fast-moving industry, Mr. Yamada said.

“Maneuvering three completely different industries, that’s too much,” Mr. Yamada said. “These should all be separate companies.”

Sony maintains that its varied units make up a coherent whole. But the history of how it acquired its hodgepodge of companies suggests otherwise.

Sony’s co-founder, Akio Morita, first got the idea of buying a finance company on a trip to the United States in the 1950s to promote the company’s new transistor radio, according to an official recounting of its corporate history. On that trip, Mr. Morita was stunned by the sight of Chicago’s skyscrapers, especially the Prudential Building that dominated the Chicago skyline.

“Why would a life insurance company have such an enormous building?” Mr. Morita marveled. “One day, we will also establish our own bank or financial institution and build a building like that.”

Mr. Morita’s wish was finally granted in 1981, when Sony started a life insurance venture in Japan with Prudential, the large American insurance company. Perhaps disappointingly, Sony Financial Holdings has its headquarters on the fourth floor of a nondescript midrise building in Tokyo.

Sony’s acquisitions of Columbia Pictures and CBS Records in the late 1980s got a lot more attention. Mr. Morita, a co-founder of Sony, and another executive, Norio Ohga, had long contended that content was crucial in promoting Sony’s expanding electronics universe, first wading into music with a venture with CBS Records in 1968.

But infighting between hardware and movies hindered that objective from the start, as did misaligned incentives that led Sony to wrestle with how to build devices that let consumers download and copy content without undermining sales at its music labels or film studios.

“Sony has tried to make this strategy work for a long time,” said Gerhard Fasol, president of the Tokyo technology consulting firm Eurotechnology Japan, “But it’s never really worked. Each part would be better competing on its own.”

Insurance never had that conflict. Sony’s 4,100 “Lifeplanners” would visit homes and offices to offer advice and make sales. Sony also runs a Web-only bank, Sony Bank, which accepts deposits and offers mortgage products, investment trusts and foreign-exchange margin trading.

On Wednesday, Mr. Hirai defended the company’s continued focus on electronics. “Electronics has a future. And it is in Sony’s DNA,” he said at a corporate presentation. “It is my mission to revive it.”

There are some glimmers that Sony is finding its way again, even as Apple and Samsung widen their lead. Sony’s sleek new XPeria Z smartphone has received generally rave reviews. Photography buffs have called its high-end, full-frame RX1 camera the most advanced compact camera.

“Not so long ago, we had despaired at Sony’s ability to ever again produce stellar products (especially when faced with duds like the Dash alarm clock and the Rolly music player),” Damian Thong, Tokyo-based technology analyst at Macquarie Securities, said in a report published Thursday.

“Yet we now have had a consistent run of beautifully designed, technologically advanced, class-leading products,” Mr. Thong said. “We think these products hark back to Sony’s glory days.”

Last quarter, Sony was back in the black, but its electronics division continued to lose money.

This article has been revised to reflect the following correction:

Correction: May 29, 2013

All about reporting | Risk.net


Intellectual Property Exchange International, Inc. (IPXI) is the world’s first financial exchange that facilitates non-exclusive licensing and trading of intellectual property (IP) rights


Intellectual Property Exchange International, Inc. (IPXI) is the world’s first financial exchange that facilitates non-exclusive licensing and trading of intellectual property (IP) rights

http://www.ipxi.com/index.php/inside-ipxi/the-exchange.html

The Exchange

Intellectual Property Exchange International, Inc. (IPXI) is the world’s first financial exchange that facilitates non-exclusive licensing and trading of intellectual property (IP) rights with market-based pricing and standardized terms. The result is an exchange that operates under two core principles: transparency and efficiency. The initial product traded on IPXI is a Unit License Right (ULR) contract. For more information, visit the ULR Contracts page. The process starts with analysis designed to give the marketplace confidence in the quality of all patents listed as ULR contracts. Then, tapping a wealth of capital markets experience, IPXI undertakes the licensing process in a manner similar to a public equity offering for a corporation by utilizing a detailed Offering Memorandum and a Roadshow, including potential purchaser one-on-one meetings. Once an Initial Offering has been priced, IPXI maintains a Secondary Market which provides ULR purchasers and sellers an opportunity to realize liquidity through resale and trading.

IPXI makes the IP licensing process more transparent through:

Analysis – IPXI performs internal and external analyses of the quality of every ULR candidate submission. This process is designed to create a comfort level for potential purchasers regarding the quality of the offerings.
Price Discovery and Standardized Terms – Market-based pricing and the terms of all ULR Offerings are published and available to all potential purchasers.
Consumption Reporting – ULR Purchasers must submit periodic consumption reports to the Exchange, which relays aggregate consumption information to Exchange members and the public. This information and the ULR contract price are key indicators of the acceptance of the technology in the market, allowing corporate decision-makers in R&D and intellectual property asset management to make better decisions regarding resource allocation.
IPXI makes the IP licensing process more efficient through:

A Central Marketplace – IPXI is a central marketplace for transacting IP licenses, providing a platform for licensors and licensees to transfer technology on standardized terms.
Easy Access to Technology – IPXI provides easy access to technology for small and large companies. ULR contracts can be acquired on an as-needed basis with minimal legal cost.
Outsourcing of Licensing Transaction Costs – IPXI identifies, evaluates, markets and audits high-quality IP licensing transactions through its ULR model.

The Asset – Magazine-StanChart completes first CNH HIBOR fixing IRS transaction


The Asset – Magazine-StanChart completes first CNH HIBOR fixing IRS transaction.

The Asset – Magazine-Banks race to be first to execute CNH/USD cross-currency swap based on CNH HIBOR


The Asset – Magazine-Banks race to be first to execute CNH/USD cross-currency swap based on CNH HIBOR.

BGC Partners Receives Approval to Conduct Principal Bond Trading in Korea


— /PRNewswire/ — BGC Partners, Inc.

via Pocket http://www.heraldonline.com/2013/05/30/4906060/bgc-partners-receives-approval.html June 01, 2013 at 06:55PM

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